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Showing posts with label K-3 Posts. Show all posts
Showing posts with label K-3 Posts. Show all posts

More BATS!


Hey everyone, Alyssha here from Teaching and Tapas. I am one of those people who LOVE everything October. Aside from it being a way-too-busy teaching obligation month (progress reports AND open house for some of us), it is so fun to get into the fall spirit!

One thing I love to do in October is a class vote/graph - Are Bats Cute or Creepy? Hang it up at the beginning of the month. Make sure the kids are able to change their votes because by the end of the month, you can convince the most squeamish students that bats are definitely cute. Like, the cutest of all animals.

On Monday, Matt from Digital Divide & Conquer wrote up a post about Bat resources using Symbaloo. I may be the last teacher alive who hasn't heard of Symbaloo. It looks AWESOME!
There was one video in particular that you MUST show your students. Lil' Drac is the epitome of every cute animal video on the internet. Seriously, so sweet.


Here is another one that you have to play with the sound on -



Okay, here is one more can't miss. This one goes beyond just cuteness - it's a great learning video.



I love surprising my students with little videos every once in a while. They're short and awesome!

Along with the bat theme, I have a great close reading freebie on bats that you may find useful. It a passage that is written at two levels (yay for differentiation!). It's perfect for 2nd and 3rd grade but could be used 1st-4th. Snag it up here!




 



Remember, it's free and super awesome! Enjoy!
Link - https://www.teacherspayteachers.com/Product/Differentiated-Close-Reading-Bats-1502633





Games To Teach Place Value

Aloha friends! Corinna here from Surfin' Through Second.  I want to share with you some fun math games that I use to teach and reinforce place value in my classroom.



Students learn best when they are engaged and having fun.  I always try to incorporate math games into each lesson to reinforce concepts and practice important skills.  Place value is such an important concept. These 5 games are fun and easy to implement in your class.  You can use dice, cards or spinners for each of these games.

I'm The Greatest

Students use number cards 0-9.  They pick a card and have to decide whether to put it in the ones, tens or hundreds place.  The object is to make the greatest number possible. They can play with a partner or you can do it as a whole class. Click {Here} to Download the cards and template.


Place Value Battle


Students use cards or dice.  They can play using 2 digit or 3 digit numbers.  The first card is placed in the hundreds place, the second in the tens and the third in the ones.  The greatest number wins.


10 More 10 Less


Students create a number using cards or dice. Then they write a new number that is 10 more or 10 less.  They can play with a partner. Partners can check answers and then create their own numbers.


Expand It


Students use the spinner templates to spin a number.  They spin on the hundreds, tens and ones. They can write it in expanded form and standard form.  The person who spins the highest number wins.
Click {HERE} to download the spinners.



Money Trade

My students love this game!  You need one and ten dollar bills.  Students choose a banker.  The banker hands out the money.  Students roll the dice.  If they roll a 6, the banker gives them 6 dollars.
Once the students have 10 or more dollar bills they can trade in 10 ones for 1 ten.  The first person to get 10 tens is the winner.


This last game is a lot of fun to play with your class. It's a great way to get those minds thinking!
Some of these games might be something you already use, but hopefully you've come away with some new ideas for your classroom.  Happy Teaching!!






Alyssha here, from Teaching and Tapas. Hi!

I am shy.

Yep, it's a part of me that I feel like is so obvious when you are around me in person. I feel my cheeks warm up and heart racing when talking to new people. So much of that shyness is internal. I say this because I have had people tell me they would never describe me as shy. That's me covering up a lot of my weird nervousness :)

As teachers, we are all trying to tune into our students. I remember 3rd grade clearly and at the end of the year I realized I had never once raised my hand to talk in front of my class. Yikes!

I've had teachers who tried forcing me to talk in front of groups. Some of my teachers were helpful and could coach me in a gentle way. Other teachers made me feel humiliated and where I wanted to hide deeper in my shell. Both of those models helped shape the way I interact with my students today. Here are a few tips to keep in mind with your own students...



1. Don't tell the student they are shy. 
When someone would point it out to me, I always felt more embarrassed and like everyone was staring at me waiting for me to speak. Yuck. The feelings of sitting there, anxiously worrying that everyone is going to notice me feeling super uncomfortable. Bad feeling. It's better to just acknowledge the shy student when the speak up just as you would acknowledge every other student. Make it seem like no big deal. Of every student/teacher relationship is different and if you have an open line of communication with a shy student, your judgement is the best.

2. Give your students plenty of options to interact with silent signals.
This does not have to be a special trick reserved only for some students. Re: Tip#1, when you point it out, shyness and anxiety may become worse. So just give ALL of your students the options to use silent signals such as sign language (thumbs up, thumbs down, "I understand" signals, etc.). Not only does this get more of your students interacting in your lessons, but you are able to check the understanding of even your quietest students.

My signal for "I agree"
My signal for "I made a connection"
3. Give a silent sign before calling on a student.
If you are confident that one of your shy students has something to add, give a little warning such as place a finger on the corner of their desk or give them a wink beforehand. It can take away that deer in the headlights feeling :) With a little warning, the student may be able to find their words and think of what they want to say. This means giving them plenty of wait time.

4. Strategic buddies.
Be sure the student is sitting near someone they can relate to and feel comfortable with. This can make such a huge difference when it comes to partnership activities, turn & talks, etc.

5. Assign special jobs.
Do you have a classroom job that requires someone to interact with individuals, but not in front of everyone? In my classroom, I had a job for someone to check book bins and make sure everyone had between 3-5 books. If they had too many or too little, this person would go remind the student to adjust their book bin. A job like this is perfect for a shy student if they are willing to talk to classmates.

So there you go! I hope my perspective gives you some more tools for your toolbox when it comes to doing all the great work you are doing with your students!



12 Easy Fundraising Ideas

Hey, y'all! 
It's Laura from Peace, Love, and First Grade! 

I've put together some of the easiest ways to earn money 
for your classroom or school. 
Let's face it!
We all need it!


Let's get started!


1) Ziggedy
This is my new favorite! 
Teachers register their classrooms, and supporters sign up and shop online. THAT'S IT! 

Downloading the Ziggedy app gives classrooms extra funds!




2) Shoparoo 
Our school just started using Shoparoo, and it's amazing how simple it is to use. Just download the app then take pictures of your receipts after shopping. That's it!

Receipts earn cash donations or sweepstakes entries, and your school can have competitions between grades.






3) Adopt A Classroom.org 
Teachers register their classrooms, and donors find
and fund classrooms with 100% tax deductible
donations. I received funds from Adopt A
Classroom last year and was able to order 
needed supplies from Office Depot.


       Register your Target Red Card for your favorite school then 1% of your total purchase will go toward that school.





5) Kroger Community Rewards
Works like the Target Red Card, just register your Kroger card for your favorite school. Your school earns 3-5% of your purchases depending on what you buy. 



6) eScrip.com 
Another shop and earn program. 
Your school can earn up to 10% of purchases made through eScrip. 

I've never used this one but have heard great things! 






Make a purchase of qualifying school
supplies, provide your school ID at checkout, and
your designated school will receive 5% back in
credits for FREE supplies!



Purchase Tyson products with the A+ label, clip the labels, and send labels to school. 
Your school will earn 24¢ for each label.



9) Box Tops 4 Education
Oh, the tried and true! BT4E is one of America's oldest and largest fundraising programs. 
Purchase products with Box Tops labels, clip the Box Tops and send them to school. 
Your school will receive 10¢ for each Box Top. 

BT4E loves to offer bonus products and coupons, so be sure to check for those!

10) Labels for Education-
You know this one, too! 
It all started with Campbell's Soup labels!! 

Collect UPCs and beverage/sauce caps from participating products and send them to school. Your school will earn points to spend at the Labels' online store, which has everything from basketballs to iPads.


11) Flipgive.com
Flipgive allows you to search for a fundraiser on their site, then shop online deals from merchants like Nike and Starbucks. Your school or other organization can earn up to 50%! 




12) Donor’sChoose 
Teachers submit project proposals, and
supporters make monetary donations to help
fund the projects. 

I received 6 Kindle Fire HDXs through 
DC two years ago. Incredible organization!


BONUS- Farmer's Insurance-Thank America's Teachers 
Teachers submit proposals for a $2500 Grant OR the $100,000 Dream Big contest. 
Online voting determines the winners! 
Hurry, though! This contest closes September 30.

Other Ideas
1) 50/50 Raffle-Sell raffle tickets and give the winner half of all money raised. For instance, if you sell $500 in raffle tickets, the winner gets $250. 

 2) Redditt Gifts-Each fall, teachers can sign up for a gift exchange. Redditt matches teachers with donors who provide needed materials up to $20. Some donors give much more.

3) Right Road Kids.org-Such an inspirational place! Paula is so incredibly generous and has tons of giveaways and offers for teachers. But, even if you never win anything, Right Road Kids is a feel-good experience! 

4) Recycling ink cartridges-Check online to find a recycling center in your area.

5)  Silent Auction-Y'all, I love a silent auction. Ask faculty and parents to send items that still have tags or hit up local businesses for items. 

6) Used Book Sale-Another easy clean-out-your-closet idea. Sell gently used books for 50¢ each. Most teachers love to read, and you could get books into the hands of children who may not have many at home. Libraries raise funds this way all the time.

Okay, so I know there are probably some crazy good fundraisers I've missed, but, y'all I'm spent, and it's way past my bedtime. 

If you have any great ideas to add, please list them below.


It's the weekend, friends!
I hope yours is happy!!





Batty Art and Verbs- Freebie From Teacher to the Core

Well hello there! Are you a planner like me? I love looking forward! So even as I am making applesauce, I am planning for some October fun! 




This is a quick and easy art project that helps kids focus in on verbs and bats! Grab it now and put it in your “To Be Copied” pile. This is fast and easy to copy and make! No tracing.

This can be done as individual art or you can make a big bulletin board of the bats. This is how I did it in 2012….. Sorry about the fuzzy picture, this was back in the day.

And 2014….. Super Fun! Click {here} to see how easy it was to make the haunted house.



Want to grab the Freebie?
Get it

Meet the Teacher-What You Should Know

Hi, friends! It's Laura from Peace, Love, and First Grade!
We've been back in school for two weeks, and I must tell you, I'm spent!

The beginning of the school year brings with it SO MUCH TO DO! 

I thought I'd try to help save you some time and stress by offering up what I've learned from 25 years of Meet the Teacher!
Let's get started!
PREP
1) Get your room in some kind of order so you aren't stressed about its appearance.

2) Prepare and print parent forms and info, whatever you plan to give to parents.

3) If you give your students B2S bags, prepare those, too.

4) Prepare and set up easy to use stations for parents to work through. There's no need to give directions 20+ times.

5) Give yourself a break and get a mani/pedi or do something else that makes you feel great!

6) Choose an outfit that makes you feel good, too!


DURING
7) Greet parents and students at the door. Offer a handshake to parents AND if your students are shorter than you, bend or squat to greet them. Tell the students how excited you are to spend the year with them. Tell parents you are looking forward to working with their children and with them.

8) Direct parents to the parent stations and suggest students explore their room. 



9) Now, this is super important! 
Make sure you find out the following (especially for the first day):

 *Tranportation: am and pm
Get specific bus numbers or day care names.  You need to know this info before parents leave your room. Most schools have a street list of buses.

One of my students rides the bus home every day except Friday. 
On Friday, his grandparents fetch him. This is something I need to know.

*Meals: How will the child eat? Will he bring a box or purchase a tray from the cafeteria? It is imperative to find out this info before Day 1.

Some students may bring their lunches most days, but get a tray on pizza day or soup and sandwich day. I suggest a check in system in your classroom for children to use each day indicating their lunch preferences. 

*Allergies: Does the child have an allergy? If so, is there a plan in place? EpiPen, etc.
Now, I have a student whose younger brother has a peanut allergy, so Mom doesn't allow my student to eat peanuts. This is not life threatening to my student. It is not HIS allergy. If someone has a peanut near him, I won't panic. However, a few years ago, one of my students had a red ant allergy with an EpiPen in the office. THAT was an allergy to watch. 

*Medical Issues: Asthma, Epilepsy, Diabetes, etc. What's the plan and what are your responsibilities? Does the child take medication at school?

I've had students with all of these diseases. You have to know the plan here. 
Does the diabetic have an insulin pump? Can she check herself? What are you required to do? 
A few years ago, I had a diabetic in my class. She was able to check herself and wore an insulin pump. I texted Mom after she checked, and Mom let me know what numbers to punch into the pump (how much insulin to deliver). She also had an emergency kit on hand if her count was off. 

**If you have a student with a life threatening disease, it is imperative you meet with the parents or a medical professional to learn as much as you can about the disease, including your responsibilities.**

*Behavior Disorders: ADHD, ODD, OCD, etc. What's the plan? Does the child take medication? If so, at home or at school?

Oh, behavior! Some students will come to you with a behavior plan in place. Others will require a behavior plan. Beginning a behavior plan is tedious on educators, but in some cases, absolutely necessary. Learn the laws in your state. DO NOT tell a parent you think his child has ADHD. Find out how your school district handles these issues and move forward from there.

I keep a fidget bag for ADHD students who need something in their hands during whole group lessons-Wikki Stix, connecting cubes, pipe cleaners (I still call them that), etc. Fidget bags really work to help students focus and remain calm.


*Check-Out:
Are there any adults who ARE NOT allowed access to your student? This one can be tricky, but today there are many divorced families with court orders, and we must know and honor those orders. Find out if you have a case like this. Usually, parents will let you know, but not always. Check those cumulative folders.

*Siblings at School: Does your student have siblings at your school? 
Sometimes you may need to send home info/homework/etc with siblings, or if your student checks out early one day, you may want to let the siblings know. Especially younger siblings who may panic if they don't see their older brothers/sisters.

*Religious Preferences:
Now, I'm going to say this, and it may not be PC, but... it's truly up to the parents to let you know if they have religious objections. Most parents will make you aware. I've taught many students whose families were Jehovah's Witnesses. They were all very up front with me, and I appreciate that so much! I don't want to offend any family, but I also need to be aware of religious preferences so I don't offend. 

*Parent Objections:
Do you plan any activities in your classroom of which parents may object? Here are a few examples.

One of my students is not allowed to have temporary tattoos. So, when cheerleaders start selling promo items, this child doesn't need to purchase paw print tattoos. I need to know this. Get my point? 

I've taught students whose parents didn't want them to go sock-footed. 
Just be proactive. Let parents know your intentions before beginning an activity that may cause objections.



Whew! That's a lot of info, and I'm sure I left off something!
But... if you're still around, here's a freebie for you to use at MTT.

-AND-
If you need resources to help you with Meet the Teacher, 
I offer 33 different themed Meet the Teacher packs in my TpT store. 
Click the pic to take you there.







10 Things to Do BEFORE You Set Up Your Classroom



Hey, there, friends! It's Laura from Peace, Love, and First Grade!

If it's summer vacation for you, enjoy! 
If not, live each day to the fullest and smile because it happened!

I'm here today to talk about getting your classroom ready for a makeover. 
Now, this is NOT my classroom reveal. 
That will come as I have time to get in my room. 
I'm excited to share that with you on my blog later this month!
Today is all about getting ready to set up your room!

Let me preface this by saying, 
I'm not trying to pressure anyone into decoration madness,
but I do believe a happy classroom is one that functions efficiently,
 and is well organized and attractive. 

This summer I read The Life-Changing Magic of Tidying Up by Marie Kondo. 
Marie is a proponent of getting your house in order and keeping it in order. 
She suggests keeping only the items in your home that bring you joy and letting go of the rest.

I think we can apply the same principle to the classroom. 
Keep what sparks joy in you and let go of the rest.

ARE YOU READY TO SEE MY MESS? 
Here you go!
Want more? 
The good news is...it doesn't look that this anymore!
So, are you ready to get your classroom in order?


Great! But remember-this is not a one day job.
I like to think of it as ten days.
Already started school?
Take one task a week for the first ten weeks.


Day 1) Clean out your children's literature. 
Keep only the books that bring you and your kiddos joy!
I know. 
I LOVE children's books, too, but let's face it. 

Not all books are created equally. 
It's okay to let go of a book. 
DON'T THROW IT OUT. 
Pass it on to someone who will find joy in it.

You'll be amazed at how much room this gives you AND you'll know what you have when you need something.

Day 2) Clean out your Math manipulatives! 
You don't need 6 bins of pattern blocks or 48 Judy clocks.
Keep what you need and pass the rest on to someone else. 
It's okay.

Day 3) Clean out your art supplies. 
If you haven't used those foam Easter bunnies in the last 3 years, get rid of them. 
Pass on the joy to someone else! No hoarding!

Day 4) Clean out your office supplies. 
Look at each one. 
If no joy comes from having them and they serve no purpose, 
pass them on to someone else or donate them. 
It's a good feeling!

Day 5) Clean out board games, puzzles, and other activities. 
If you don't use them, someone else can. 
If Czechoslovakia is still on your globe...you get it.
Share your treasures.

Day 6) Do I dare say it...Clean out your paper. 
Oh, it's tough! I know it is. I've done it. But the feeling is just so great! 
If you haven't used it or it turns your fingers purple...you don't need it.
Recycle that paper!

Day 7) Decide how you will store supplies.
Once you decide what manipulatives and supplies you are going to keep, choose how you are going to store them. 
Then label your supplies. 
Labeling makes supplies easier to find for students and other adults who may visit. 

NOW-
The next two may not be popular, but I'm going with them.

Day 8) Get rid of your filing cabinet OR scale down to a smaller one.
The more room you have for stuff, the more stuff you'll acquire.
If there's no where to put the stuff, you won't be as likely to hold onto it.

Day 9) Get rid of your teacher desk OR scale down to a smaller one.
You can do it! I did and I had a lot of stuff in mine, too.
I never sat there (not even after school), and it took up a great deal of space. 
Now, that space is used by my first graders, and I don't miss my desk one bit!
I use an over-the-door shoe organizer for my office supplies. 
Space saver!

Day 10) Plan your classroom design.
Once the clutter is removed and you are ready to set up your room,
 go online and play around with a classroom set-up tool. 
You can design your whole room as many times as you like.
You'll need your room measurements for this.

Here are a few good ones:



This is the one I use. 


Now you are ready to think decor! 

Let me tell you, if I can do it, you can do it?
Did you see my mess above?
It doesn't look like that anymore.

This week, I can get in my building to work and I plan to make the most of it. 
Pics to come on my blog!
Happy Tuesday!!


Don't forget! We're blogging every day this month at Primary Chalkboard!